Schwank announces $392,427 in PCCD grant funding for Berks County

The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency approved grant funding Wednesday for three Berks County projects.

Kutztown University received $133,300 in Federal State Opioid Response Funds in support of the SBIRT Enhancement Project. SBIRT is an acronym for Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment, a public health approach that delivers intervention services to individuals at risk of developing substance abuse issues. Kutztown University offers SBIRT screening to students.

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Berks Connections/Pretrial Services received one Federal Byrne Justice Assistance Grants for a total of $249,999. The funding will go towards the reentry services for Berks County residents with previous justice system involvement.

Brecknock Township received $9,128 in grant funding from the Federal Body Warn Camera Policy and Implementation Program in support of the Brecknock Township Police Department BWC Program.

Sen. Judy Schwank said all three projects demonstrate a commitment to making Berks County a better place to live.

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“These funds will go towards a wide range of initiatives that will be of great benefit to the entire county,” Schwank said.

“Addressing substance abuse, investing in reentry services, and body cameras that help keep officers safe and strengthen evidence quality are all items I believe the vast majority of Berks Countians wholeheartedly support. I commended this group of award recipients for putting together strong applications and taking advantage of these grant funding opportunities.”

Artículo en: Español (Spanish)

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Berks Weekly
Berks Weekly
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